Biden to select Deb Haaland as Interior Secretary, the first Native American to hold that position, if confirmed

President-elect Joe Biden will nominate Rep. Deb Haaland to be Secretary of the Interior. If

President-elect Joe Biden will nominate Rep. Deb Haaland to be Secretary of the Interior. If confirmed, she will be the first Native American to serve in that position.

The Department of the Interior is home to the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Haaland, 59, D-N.M., is an enrolled citizen of the Pueblo of Laguna Native American tribe and serves on the House Natural Resources Committee. She was one of the first two Native American women elected to the United States Congress, the other being Rep. Sharice Davids, D-Kansas.

The selection was confirmed to USA TODAY by a source familiar with the decision who was not authorized to speak publicly.

On Nov. 23, Haaland told NPR that if she was nominated for the Interior role, it “would mean a lot to Indian Country.”

More: Rep. Debra Haaland becomes first Native American woman to preside over House

New Mexico Congresswoman Deb Haaland, who in 2018 became the first of two Native American women to join the congressional ranks, along with Kansas Democrat Sharice Davids, is shown here speaking to supporters during her visit to the Albuquerque Indian Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in 2018.
New Mexico Congresswoman Deb Haaland, who in 2018 became the first of two Native American women to join the congressional ranks, along with Kansas Democrat Sharice Davids, is shown here speaking to supporters during her visit to the Albuquerque Indian Center in Albuquerque, New Mexico, in 2018.

“It means a lot to a group of people who have been here since time immemorial to know that they’re truly being represented,” she told NPR. “I think it would really change the way people see our federal government.”

Under the Obama administration, several Native Americans served in top positions in the agency such as Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs, director of Indian Health Service, and as Deputy Secretary of the Interior. But the 171-year-old cabinet-level department has never had a Native American at its helm.

On the campaign trail last year, Biden did not explicitly promise to make history by appointing a Native American to the position. But in a questionnaire he submitted as part of a Native American presidential forum in January, the former vice president pledged to diversify his cabinet.

“As president, I will nominate and appoint people who look like the country they serve, including Native Americans,” he wrote in the seven-page questionnaire provided to USA TODAY by Four Directio, an advocacy group that co-sponsored the forum. “That will be true across my Administration, but I also recognize the special importance of appointing Native Americans to play critical roles in upholding the government-to-government relationship.”

As part of the Department of the Interior, the Bureau of Indian Affairs manages and administers 55 million acres of estates held in trust by the United States for Native American tribes.

Rep. Deb Haaland (D-NM) stands during the 116th Congress and swearing-in ceremony on the floor of the US House of Representatives at the US Capitol on January 3, 2019 in Washington, D.C.
Rep. Deb Haaland (D-NM) stands during the 116th Congress and swearing-in ceremony on the floor of the US House of Representatives at the US Capitol on January 3, 2019 in Washington, D.C.

The United States government has a complicated and violent history with Native American tribes. Over centuries, the U.S. government has broken dozens of treaties with tribes, pushed Indigenous people off of their ancestral land and for years forced Native American children into boarding schools that worked to strip them of their native identity.

Prior to being elected to the House of Representatives, Haaland served as the chair of the Democratic Party of New Mexico. Before that, she ran for lieutenant governor of the state in 2014.

Haaland’s appointment is a win for progressives, who had the congresswoman at the top of the list of who Biden should appoint for Interior Secretary.

In addition, dozens of Democrats in the House of Representatives in mid-November sent a letter to Biden’s transition team, urging the president-elect to select Haaland, according to Politico. The Indigenous Environmental Network, along with 25 organizations, also sent a letter to Biden’s team in support of Haaland.

With his selection of Haaland, Biden will again eat into the party’s majority in the House of Representatives.

“I’m certainly concerned by the slimming of the majority,” House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer, D-Md.told reporters Dec. 9 on a press call. “I have indicated to the administration very early on that I wanted them to be very careful in terms of the members that they appointed from the Congress given the closeness of our majority.”

However, Haaland’s district, New Mexico’s 1st Congressional District, has been represented by Democrats since 2009.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi through her support behind Haaland in a statement Dec. 16, saying, “Congresswoman Deb Haaland is one of the most respected and one of the best Members of Congress I have served with. I am so proud that, as one of the first Native American women to have served in Congress, she serves as Chair of the Natural Resources Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Public Lands. Congresswoman Haaland knows the territory, and if she is the President-elect’s choice for Interior Secretary, then he will have made an excellent choice.”

Biden has vowed to have a diverse cabinet, noting that he wants his administration to look like the United States.

His nominations thus far have included: Alejandro Mayorkas, a Cuban American, as the first Latino head of the Department of Homeland Security; Janet Yellen as the first woman to head the Treasury; Avril Haines as the first female director of national intelligence and Linda Thomas-Greenfield, a Black woman, as his ambassador to the United Nations. He has also appointed an all-female communications staff.

He also has selected Rep. Marcia Fudge to lead the Department of Housing and Urban Development, only the second Black woman to hold that position.

This article originally appeared on USA TODAY: Joe Biden selects Deb Haaland to lead Interior, first Native American in role